The whole story is here, but the short of it is this:

In an effort to get her daughters into a better public school, Akron, Ohio mother Kelley Williams-Bolar claimed the girls lived at their father’s residence instead of the projects. Apparently, this is quite illegal in Akron, as the woman was jailed for 10 days, sentenced to 3 years of probation and, worst of all, could permanently lose her opportunity to realize her dreams of becoming a teacher herself due to this felony conviction.

I’m not really going to defend her actions or cry racism (yes, Ms. Williams-Bolar is black)…plenty of other people doing that for me. And while part of me wants to join in, the truth is that she still broke the law, and it’s not quite as light a matter as it looks at first glance.

This particular school system is set up so that it’s directly funded by the local tax base.  Consequently, the state’s position on the case is that Williams-Bolar effectively defrauded the system to get a better education for her kids.

I can see the state’s point. But I’m certainly not going to defend that point, either, because in this system the result is that poor districts are considerably less well-funded than wealthier ones. Added to the myriad of social issues faced by such schools, it’s hard to fault a parent for gaming the system.

There are a few lessons here to ponder:

  • Two “wrongs” still don’t make a “right.” Too often, people try to take ethical shortcuts to get what they want. Even if it’s a noble goal like getting your children better-educated, the ends don’t justify any amount of cheating to get it done. Just because “everyone does it” doesn’t make it right.
  • This goes double for black folks. Eventually, the system will reassert its authority. When an example is then made, it’s the poor and the minority who are likely to take the brunt of it. We need to walk in excellence and integrity so that we are beyond reproach.
  • School choice should be a given! Why should poor families be utterly locked by law into underperforming public schools? Why do teachers’ unions fight so tooth-and-nail against choice-based reforms? (And, even under the current system, why can’t a split-residence family like Williams-Bolar’s claim a preferred district? The taxes are still being paid by the students’ parents.)

The judge who sentenced Williams-Bolar is getting personally involved to try to ensure the mom won’t be barred from starting her teaching career, so maybe there’ll be an eventual happy ending to this bit of unjust justice.

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The greatest American...?

This week, a few North Georgian school systems intended to make up one of last week’s snow days by holding classes on the national observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, sparking controversy. It’s emblematic of a cavalier, even resentful attitude toward this man who, in some minds, doesn’t rate the treatment.

They don’t understand that MLK Day is the most important national observance we have. Period.

It’s more important than Veterans’ Day.

It’s more important than Memorial Day.

It’s more important than even Independence Day.

No, I’m not backing off from this. I can defend it completely on any grounds you choose to argue from.

I can certainly hear the sputtering, outraged arguments against my statement, most of which boil down to this:

“Why, without the efforts of our veterans or the founding fathers, we wouldn’t have a NATION, much less a MLK Day!”

To that argument, I say a wholehearted “Amen.” Much blood was shed to establish this, the greatest country in the world, and to maintain its freedom.

But I add this cogent fact: Despite all that sacrifice and the great ideals of the founders that set America into motion, it was not until Dr. King that Americans truly became free and the ideals of this nation were actually begun to be realized.

To wit: America did not actually become the home of the free until sometime after the Bicentennial (1976). That’s about the time when not only were the last vestiges of Jim Crow finally swept away from American law, but people were finally allowed by society at large to interact with each other as equals…if they so chose.

More importantly, the first generation to have no memory of segregation were entering our formative years. And we indeed grew up to realize at least a large portion of Dr. King’s dream.

Most importantly, and the reason why I hold up MLK Day above all other patriotic holidays, is that it’s through his inspirational leadership that this change was effected without violence. I don’t think people realize how many lives were saved by his efforts.

You see, my parents’ generation was going to be the last generation to grow up under Jim Crow laws. Make no mistake: by the 1960s, even the most peace-loving of young black Americans were ready to die for their freedom. And I have to believe that our will and resolve in the resultant race war would’ve been far greater than that of the white majority.

Far greater. Blood would have run in the streets, and not nearly all of it ours.

I also have to believe that a protracted civil war against its own (second-class) citizens would have been absolutely disastrous for America and the world at large with the Cold War still in full swing. America would have lost that war and the entire world might be under Communist rule now and there simply wouldn’t be a free nation strong enough to protect its freedom.

So. The next time you think this is just a “black” holiday honoring one of “our” heroes, think again.

MLK saved America. Not only that, but he called her into her true greatness.

And I have to think that the founders are well pleased.

(Oh, and those N. GA schools? They closed on MLK Day anyway due to the persistent ice. I think God knows what He’s doing, too.)